Our Young Loon is Learning to Fly

October 17th, 2016

Just in time for his/her first migration.

fullsizerender-3

Photo: Jim and Sharon Morgan

Update on the Dam

October 2nd, 2016

The dam reconstruction project that began earlier this summer is nearing completion.

Corrected by Perfectly Clear on Sunday, October 2, 2016 at 6:32:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time

The large crane has been removed.  All sections of the dam have been completed.  The new walkway across the auxiliary spillway is in place.

The photo timeline of the project has been updated HERE.

Q and A with Loon Expert Eric Hanson

September 2nd, 2016

Inspired by the Lake Fairlee loons, Vermont’s loon expert was kind enough to answer some (mostly serious) questions for Northern Woodlands about loons generally.

 

loon_flight

Click on the image above to read the interview with Eric Hanson, a biologist for the Vermont Loon Conservation Project, on the Northern Woodlands website.

Pictures of our Loon Chick

August 27th, 2016
image

Photo by Tig Tillinghast

Finally some photos of our lake’s newest resident.  S/he has been seen at many locations on the lake, in the company of one or both parents.

The juveniles are able to catch their own fish within two months and take flight at about 11 weeks. They are fully on their own at 12 weeks, when the parents begin migration in the fall. At this time, the young form flocks on northern lakes and follow suit a few weeks later. Once they reach the coastal ocean waters, the loons remain there for two years, returning in the third to the northern lakes where they were born to live a routine adult life.

The following photos were supplied by Jim and Sharon Morgan, taken from their dock, on August 24th.   The chick is probably about four weeks old.

With both parents

With both parents

 

They are clearly beginning flight training and the chick now dives for 10 - 15 seconds

They are clearly beginning flight training and the chick now dives for 10 – 15 seconds

 

Progress on the Dam

August 25th, 2016

Work continues on the reconstruction of the dam.  The house has been moved back to its original location, but about three feet higher, on the columns we saw in the earlier photos.  Pedestals have appeared on the auxiliary spillway, which will support the new, safer, all metal walkway out to the camp.IMG_5029_Snapseed

New photos taken August 20th have been added to the Dam Chronology page HERE.

Loon Update

August 3rd, 2016

The following was received from a LFA member who lives on the lake near the Loons’ nest:

“We can confirm that the two loons nesting on Lake Fairlee have hatched a single baby chick. I watched it swimming between the parents this evening in the vicinity of the sandbar where it was hatched. The parents are very attentive. Apparently they made all sorts of interesting calls throughout the night. We will keep a close eye on our lake’s newest resident!”

August 3, 2016 at 7:48:14 PM EDT

More Information on the Nesting Loons

August 3rd, 2016

loon4

We are glad to direct you to an informative article written by our friend/neighbor/photographer who captured the photos on our earlier post.  Read it HERE.

We are hoping soon to post a photo of the newly hatched baby loons.  But we need your help, and are declaring a no-contest.  Please send your entries to skip@lakefairlee.org.  No-prizes will be awarded.

Timeline Photos of the Dam Construction

August 3rd, 2016

 

IMG_4828_Snapseed

 

Link HERE to a page of dam photos arranged in chronological order, showing the progress of construction to date.  It will be updated from time to time.

Nesting Loons on the Lake

July 28th, 2016

This year for the first time in many years our resident loons have successfully built a nest and are expecting.

loon1

One of the prospective parents sitting on the nest.

Their nest is located in the mouth of Blood Brook.

loon3

The loon stretches its neck and lowers its head while fishermen are nearby

As of a few days ago there are no hatchlings as yet, but the parents are tending the eggs in shifts and we are hopeful.

Please respect their privacy and give the area a wide berth.

The Vermont Center for Ecostudies operates the Vermont Loon Conservation Project.  Lots more information at their website.

Progress on the Dam

July 25th, 2016

Work continues on the dam.  The house has been moved up on top of the columns we saw in the last pictures, right back in its original location, but about three feet higher.  Support pedestals have been built on top of the auxiliary spillway, which will support the new, safer, steel walkway out to the camp.

IMG_5029_Snapseed

Photos from August 20th have been added to the Dam Chronology page HERE.